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  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

We Don't See Things the Same Way


 

In graduate school for counseling, students in my cohort were offered extra credit for attending a transitory art display. Although I’ve enjoyed going to museums since childhood, I’ve never been fond of art gazing at museums, studios, or galleries.

 

Nevertheless, I wasn’t going to pass up on extra credit. Looking at the product of artistic expression presented before students was about as exciting to me as watching NASCAR. (Viewing cars repeatedly turning left isn’t exciting to me.)

 

Because I was bored to the point of falling asleep while standing up, I decided to speak with other people as a means of staying awake. Surprisingly, a number of my peers reported seeing the exhibit in a way I was unable to envision on my own.

 

One student told me about how moved she was by use of human subjects which were depicted in various stages of emotion. All I saw were etchings a mediocre level artistry that a child could’ve produced.

 

Another student told me that what appealed to her was the oral narrative offered through headphones for one piece. I looked at the offering while listening to audio and thought about how the piece was derivative and the use of a soundtrack was manipulative.

 

Now that I think about it, I sound like the sort of pretentious art critics who used to judge my drawings and graffiti pieces when I was younger. And this is the purpose of the current blogpost.

 

It may sound like a self-evident claim, though I’m going to risk violating a rule of my seventh grade science teacher who was fond of stating, “Don’t comment on the obvious! It’s boring.” People don’t see things the same way.

 

I looked at the traveling art showcase when in grad school and I saw an exhibit masquerading as an insightful gallery of meaningful work. However, a number of my peers saw artistic endeavors which resonated with them on a level I couldn’t understand.

 

My interpretation of the framed pieces wasn’t correct, nor was it wrong. Likewise, the perspective of my peers wasn’t good, nor was it bad. We merely didn’t view matters in a similar manner.

 

Nevertheless, it occurs to me that with the process of self-disturbance, people cling to irrational beliefs about how information encountered in life should, must, or ought to be interpreted. Oh, you didn’t like the latest movie? You’re a bigot!

 

You don’t like so-and-so’s new album? You have no taste. You voted for whom? You’re an extremist! You pray to whom? You’re a terrorist! And so on and so forth.

 

Through use of demandingness (e.g., you should appreciate art exhibits), awfulizing (e.g., it’s terrible not to appreciate art), low frustration tolerance (e.g., I can’t stand anyone who doesn’t like art), and global evaluations (e.g., anyone who doesn’t like art is uncouth), people upset themselves when failing to understand that we don’t see things the same way.

 

When thinking of the dichotomous way by which people irrationally believes others should view the world, I consider the electronic synth-pop music of Positronic, in particular the song “Higher Point of View.” Lyrics include:

 

I say it’s black and you say it’s white. You say it’s cold and I say that’s not right. We don’t see things the same way, but I hope to someday. Maybe you could show me how to see things your way. (Lift me higher) Oh, lift me up. (Lift me higher) I want to see things like you do. (Oh, lift me up. Lift me higher). To a different point of view. (Lift me higher)

 

By recognizing that not everyone’s perspective is the same, we can keep from upsetting ourselves with unhelpful beliefs about art, politics, and other matters in life. It’s not even an issue of appreciating the views of others, as much as I’m advocating mere recognition of differing points of view.

 

Although my seventh grade science teacher maintained that commenting on the obvious was boring, I have a different perspective. We don’t see things the same way… nor should we.

 

If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life—helping you to sharpen your critical thinking skills, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.

 

As the world’s original electronic dance music (EDM)-influenced REBT psychotherapist—promoting content related to EDM, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.

 

At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!

 

 

Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW

 

References:

 

Castellano, E. (2024, April 18). A man and a woman looking at an empty [Image]. Playground. Retrieved from https://playground.com/post/a-man-and-a-woman-looking-at-an-empty-white-art-painting-l-clv5ixmyr007ps601igm8qxvq

Hollings, D. (2022, October 31). Demandingness. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/demandingness

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (2023, September 8). Fair use. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/fair-use

Hollings, D. (2024, April 2). Four major irrational beliefs. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/four-major-irrational-beliefs

Hollings, D. (2023, October 12). Get better. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/get-better

Hollings, D. (2023, September 13). Global evaluations. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/global-evaluations

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2023, September 19). Life coaching. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/life-coaching

Hollings, D. (2022, December 2). Low frustration tolerance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/low-frustration-tolerance

Hollings, D. (2022, November 1). Self-disturbance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/self-disturbance

Hollings, D. (2022, October 7). Should, must, and ought. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/should-must-and-ought

Hollings, D. (2022, November 15). To don a hat. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/to-don-a-hat

Hollings, D. (2022, November 14). Touching a false dichotomy. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/touching-a-false-dichotomy

Positronic. (n.d.). Positronic [Official website]. Retrieved from https://iampositronic.wixsite.com/website

 Positronic – Topic. (2018, August 1). Higher Point of View [Video]. YouTube. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/mCXRS6n4ZnA?si=Gcv9EUt01D7xTDBq

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