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  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

In Terms of REBT

 

Page 26 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion invites Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) practitioners to remember that although REBT can be a shorter term therapy model, some clients with severe self-disturbance may require longer term treatment or management.

 

Since beginning practice of REBT, I’ve worked with clients for short- and long-term psychotherapy. For instance, person X may present to session with wanting to overcome avoidance of beginning a family.

 

Use of unconditional acceptance and acknowledgement about one’s limited control and influence over the matters which keep person X from starting a familial unit can be worked through relatively quickly. After six to seven sessions, I may never again see this individual.

 

On the other hand, person Y may reach out to me for help with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with a motor vehicle accident (MVA). As I work with this individual, I discover that person Y also experienced trauma in childhood and likely has traumatic brain injury (TBI) from the MVA.

 

Though each of my clients is unique, generally speaking, complex PTSD of person Y’s type may require longer term treatment or management. As well, because I’m not a physician, I may invite person Y to contact a qualified medical provider for assessment of TBI symptoms.

 

Of this, page 27 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion encourages REBT clinicians to refer clients to other competent personnel if doing so is in the clients’ longer term interests. Depending on person Y’s progress, I may see this individual for any number of years.

 

Page 28 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion further advocates the exploration of clients’ expectation for psychotherapy. In a blogpost entitled Managing Expectations, I specifically address this matter.

 

In particular, I correct foreseeable misconceptions about my approach to REBT. Ultimately, that post states that I retain three goals for working with the persons X and Y of the world:

 

  1. I seek to help people push through discomfort so that they may grow.

  2. Rather than helping clients feel better, I aim to help them get better.

  3. I try to help people achieve a higher level of functioning and improved quality of life.

 

Whether I see clients for short- or long-term treatment or management, I lay out the terms for my approach to their care so they may make a well-informed decision before consenting to the therapeutic alliance. Does this sound like something in which you might be interested?

 

If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life—helping you to sharpen your critical thinking skills, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.

 

As a psychotherapist, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues ranging from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.

 

At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!

 

 

Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW

 

 

References:

 

Dryden, W. and Neenan, M. (2003). The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion. Albert Ellis Institute. ISBN 0-917476-26-3. Library of Congress Control Number: 20031044378

Hollings, D. (2022, November 18). Big T, little t. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/big-t-little-t

Hollings, D. (2022, May 17). Circle of concern. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/circle-of-concern

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (2023, September 8). Fair use. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/fair-use

Hollings, D. (2023, October 12). Get better. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/get-better

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2023, September 19). Life coaching. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/life-coaching

Hollings, D. (2023, April 26). Managing expectations. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/managing-expectations

Hollings, D. (2022, March 25). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy-rebt

Hollings, D. (2022, November 1). Self-disturbance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/self-disturbance

Hollings, D. (2024, January 11). Therapeutic alliance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/therapeutic-alliance

Hollings, D. (2022, July 11). Unconditional acceptance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/unconditional-acceptance

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