top of page
  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

Emotional Responsibility

 

One of the major concepts that led me to choose Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) over other psychotherapeutic modalities was that the model focuses on personal responsibility and accountability rather than a victimhood approach offered by some other modalities.

 

Using the ABC model, REBT theory maintains that when an Activating event occurs and a person irrationally Believes something unhelpful about the situation, it’s the individual’s assumption and not the event itself that causes an unpleasant Consequence.

 

With this ABC model, cascading events are understood not to create outcomes, presumably forming an Action-Consequence connection. Rather, a person can take personal responsibility and accountability for these outcomes through acknowledgment of the Belief-Consequence connection.

 

In this way, instead of maintaining that something happens to you and you’re nothing more than a victim of circumstance, you can assume emotional responsibility. By recognizing that you self-disturb through use of unhelpful beliefs, you can break the chain of events which results in unproductive consequences.

 

Regarding this matter, page 80 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion invites REBT practitioners to encourage clients to discover how emotional responsibility applies in the lives of clients, as well as through the experiences of others. I usually foster this process by use of negotiated homework with my clients.

 

As well, page 81 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion reminds REBT practitioners to teach clients that emotional responsibility isn’t about self-blame for emotional problems. Clients are responsible, though not damnable for their responsibility in the ABC process.

 

With my clients, I encourage use of unconditional acceptance to reinforce this notion. Although we may take personal ownership for our unpleasant outcomes, the experience of self-disturbing beliefs is nothing about which to be ashamed.

 

If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life—helping you to sharpen your critical thinking skills, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.

 

As a psychotherapist, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues ranging from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.

 

At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!

 

 

Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW


 

References:

 

Dryden, W. and Neenan, M. (2003). The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion. Albert Ellis Institute. ISBN 0-917476-26-3. Library of Congress Control Number: 20031044378

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (2023, September 8). Fair use. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/fair-use

Hollings, D. (2023, October 12). Get better. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/get-better

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2023, May 18). Irrational beliefs. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/irrational-beliefs

Hollings, D. (2023, September 19). Life coaching. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/life-coaching

Hollings, D. (2022, November 7). Personal ownership. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/personal-ownership

Hollings, D. (2023, September 15). Psychotherapeutic modalities. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/psychotherapeutic-modalities

Hollings, D. (2022, March 24). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy-rebt

Hollings, D. (2022, November 1). Self-disturbance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/self-disturbance

Hollings, D. (2022, November 9). The ABC model. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-abc-model

Hollings, D. (2022, December 23). The A-C connection. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-a-c-connection

Hollings, D. (2022, December 25). The B-C connection. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-b-c-connection

Hollings, D. (2022, July 11). Unconditional acceptance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/unconditional-acceptance

Hollings, D. (2022, November 25). Victimhood. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/victimhood

Mindandi. (n.d.). Problem solving, close up view on hand of business woman stopping falling blocks on table for concept about taking […] [Image]. Freepik. Retrieved from https://www.freepik.com/free-photo/problem-solving-close-up-view-hand-business-woman-stopping-falling-blocks-table-concept-about-taking-responsibility_1203375.htm#fromView=search&page=1&position=1&uuid=229302d6-61a7-4c87-af13-54e5551aa88f

Recent Posts

See All

Goals

Comments


bottom of page