top of page
  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

Applying the Method


 

My military occupational specialty in the Marine Corps was military police (MP). Although some people have told me how glamourous they imagine the job was, in actuality it was often a bureaucratic bore.

 

At any rate, when stationed in Okinawa, Japan between 1997 and 1999, MPs relied on Okinawan interpreters to communicate with local personnel. Rotating between patrol and dispatch duties, I spent a significant amount of time conversing with interpreters when there wasn’t much work to be done.

 

One of these gentlemen who taught me quite a bit about Okinawan and Japanese history, culture, and tradition was an individual I’ll refer to as “Tonysan,” a 57-year-old man. For the record, he once informed me that he wasn’t Japanese; he was “Ryukyuan,” or merely “Okinawan.”

 

Being from Texas and identifying myself as a Texan versus “American,” I appreciated his distinction. At any rate, while performing dispatch duties one evening, I observed Tonysan focusing on writing something over and over again.

 

When I ask about what required so much effort, Tonysan explained that he was practicing his alphabet. I thought something along the lines of, “Wait, what? You’re knocking at the door of 60-years-old and haven’t figured out how to write your alphabet?”

 

Expressing my disbelief, Tonysan invited me over to his desk and explained to me that the Japanese language has three types of characters – Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji. Although he’d written these characters throughout his life, Tonysan said perfecting his technique took lifelong practice.

 

He also explained that as a sensei with a fifth degree black belt in karate, the manner in which Tonysan applied the method of writing also translated into how he practiced martial arts. Looking back to that period in life, I wish I would’ve taken him up on his offer to join his dojo.

 

With a focus on improvement through the continual application of one skill, Tonysan would essentially benefit from the process of self-improvement with karate. Recently, I told the story of Tonysan to a client who I suspected would appreciate the lesson.

 

When teaching people about Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), I communicate the importance routinely applying this method in order for transferable skills to synthesize with other areas of life. Currently, I’m grateful for the wisdom imparted on me from Tonysan.

 

Although I don’t invite people to seek perfection regarding the employment of REBT, I do encourage work and practice in order to become more competent with the method. If a person can demonstrate proficiency with REBT in a session, it’s likely that use of techniques will also produce success outside of sessions.

 

If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life—helping you to sharpen your critical thinking skills, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.

 

As a psychotherapist, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues ranging from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.

 

At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!

 

 

Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW

 

References:

 

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (2023, October 12). Get better. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/get-better

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2024, April 17). I go to work. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/i-go-to-work

Hollings, D. (2023, September 19). Life coaching. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/life-coaching

Hollings, D. (2023, June 3). Perfect is the enemy of good. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/perfect-is-the-enemy-of-good

Hollings, D. (2022, March 24). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy-rebt

Wikipedia. (n.d.). Ryukyuan people. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryukyuan_people

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Commentaires


bottom of page