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  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

What is rEBt?


When familiarizing people with Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), I usually begin by discussing the ABC Model. To illustrate how I do this, it may be useful to understand how the model is arranged.


(A)ction – What occurred


(B)elief – What you told yourself about (A) that resulted in (C)


(C)onsequence – What you felt (emotion or bodily sensation) about what happened and what you did (behavior)


(D)isputation – How you might challenge (D) what you told yourself (B), which led to (C)


(E)ffective new belief – What (E)ffective new beliefs, also called “effective belief” (EB), you can tell yourself rather than using unhelpful or unhealthy narratives (B)


Now, I’ll use an imagined example to demonstrate how the model works.


(A)ction – Typically, John Doe will not commit to plans when his cousin Henry requests a response regarding an invitation to Henry’s wedding.


(B)elief – Henry tells himself, “This is awful, because I can’t stand when people blow me of and John ought to know better than to prolong his reply.”


(C)onsequence – Henry becomes angry, he experiences tightness in his chest, and he blocks John on all social media platforms.


When using the REBT method, I find value in working towards a goal with clients. Suppose Henry tells me that rather than anger, he’d prefer annoyance and the ability to be receptive if John attempts to confirm the invitation.


(D)isputation – Disputing the self-disturbing belief, Henry admits that while he’d prefer John to RSVP, it’s unreasonable to demand a response. As well, Henry recognizes that John has a history of noncommittal. Instead of angering himself by what is, rather than what Henry thinks ought to be, he can use unconditional other-acceptance.


(E)ffective belief – Henry concludes, “While I’d like for John to do as I wish, he’s under no obligation to do so and I know John has a pattern of indecisiveness, so I won’t stipulate for him to behave otherwise.”


Practitioners of REBT maintain that there isn’t an action-consequence connection. Rather, people tend to disturb themselves using a belief-consequence connection.


When practicing REBT, we don’t dispute the action, because that’s a real event that is likely beyond our control. Likewise, we don’t dispute the consequence, because it’s a real result of what we told ourselves.


Rather than disputing realistic matters that are either beyond our control or which serve as the aftereffect of our unhelpful beliefs, we instead focus on challenging our assumptions and attitudes which cause the consequence. We dispute beliefs.


The aim of disputation is to develop an EB. We can then plug this healthy belief into the ABC Model to determine whether or not it better serves out interests or goals.


(A) – Typically, John will not commit to plans when his cousin Henry requests a response regarding an invitation to Henry’s wedding.


(EB) – Henry concludes, “While I’d like for John to do as I wish, he’s under no obligation to do so and I know John has a pattern of indecisiveness, so I won’t stipulate for him to behave otherwise.”


(C) – Though Henry is slightly annoyed by John’s hesitancy, Henry is no longer angry. As well, Henry has no significant chest or bodily sensations and he unblocks John on all social media platforms, leaving the line of communication open.


Henry’s therapeutic goal of preferring annoyance over anger, and giving himself the ability to be receptive if John attempts to confirm the invitation, has been met. This is what rEBt is and how it may serve you.


If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.


As a psychotherapist, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues ranging from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.


At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!



Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW


Image created using Adobe Express



References:


Adobe Express. (n.d.). Make a free project with Adobe Express. Retrieved from https://www.adobe.com/express/

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Blog – Categories: Disputation. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/blog/categories/disputation

Hollings, D. (2022, May 17). Circle of concern. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/circle-of-concern

Hollings, D. (2022, October 31). Demandingness. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/demandingness

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2022, December 2). Low frustration tolerance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/low-frustration-tolerance

Hollings, D. (2023, March 4). M-E-T-H-O-D, man. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/m-e-t-h-o-d-man

Hollings, D. (2022, March 25). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy-rebt

Hollings, D. (2022, November 1). Self-disturbance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/self-disturbance

Hollings, D. (2022, October 7). Should, must, and ought. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/should-must-and-ought

Hollings, D. (2022, November 9). The ABC model. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-abc-model

Hollings, D. (2022, December 23). The A-C connection. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-a-c-connection

Hollings, D. (2022, December 25). The B-C connection. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-b-c-connection

Hollings, D. (2022, November 15). To don a hat. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/to-don-a-hat

Hollings, D. (2023, February 25). Unconditional other-acceptance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/unconditional-other-acceptance

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