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  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

Recalling Information

 

When I was a child, I didn’t know that I qualified for a diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Contrarily, what I knew was that I had significant difficulty recalling information.

 

It wasn’t until I was in the Marine Corps that I was diagnosed with ADHD. I then learned different techniques to help me learn, retain, and recall knowledge.

 

One approach I found helpful was note-taking. Interestingly, this method was also useful in childhood though I drew sketches on notebook paper rather than drafting alphanumeric data for information retention.

 

However, on many occasions, I was subjected to punishment for drawing when educators lectured to the class. All the same, I could look at an elaborate sketch and accurately describe what a teacher was saying and when in the lecture it was stated.

 

Building upon my understanding about information recall, I was able to successfully earn three higher education degrees though use of note-taking. Now that I practice Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), I find it useful to take notes in my sessions.

 

By doing so, I’m able to track the progress of clients with whom I work. As well, I encourage clients to take notes to facilitate information recall, per page 44 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion.

 

For example, when conducting psychoeducation I realize that it may be useful for newer clients to provide themselves with a visual aid of their own making. As these clients progress in their treatment or management, they can reflect upon learned lessons to build upon their knowledge base.

 

Additionally, I invite clients to write down negotiated homework tasks. Not only may this help with recalling information, clients create a record of agreed-upon exercises and this form of reminder contributes to personal responsibility and accountability for each client.

 

Although page 45 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion advocates allowing clients to “tape-record their therapy sessions,” I generally oppose this practice for the unique mental health care services I provide. In fact, it’s expressly stated in my informed consent documentation that such behavior isn’t allowed.

 

For prospective clients with specific disabilities which create the need for such an accommodation, I may be able to negotiate this rule. For all others, I find that note-taking for information recall can significantly improve one’s ability to effectively practice REBT.

 

If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life—helping you to sharpen your critical thinking skills, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.

 

As a psychotherapist, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues ranging from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.

 

At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!

 

 

Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW

 

 

References:

 

Dryden, W. and Neenan, M. (2003). The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion. Albert Ellis Institute. ISBN 0-917476-26-3. Library of Congress Control Number: 20031044378

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (2023, September 8). Fair use. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/fair-use

Hollings, D. (2023, October 12). Get better. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/get-better

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2023, September 19). Life coaching. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/life-coaching

Hollings, D. (2022, November 7). Personal ownership. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/personal-ownership

Hollings, D. (2024, January 1). Psychoeducation. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/psychoeducation

Hollings, D. (2022, March 25). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy-rebt

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