top of page
  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

Rational Living

 

For a number of years, I’ve practiced Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) in my personal and professional life. This psychotherapeutic modality is a form of cognitive behavior therapy that has a number of benefits which I thusly addressed in a blogpost entitled Stoicism:

 

1) Per one source, “[M]inimize dysfunctional distress and enhance satisfaction, functioning, resilience under duress, goal attainment, and joy in the process of living.”

2) Promote healthy living based on rational thinking.

3) Help people to get better rather than to merely feel better.

 

Collectively, these objectives equate to the practice of rational living. The late psychologist who developed REBT, Albert Ellis, described the process of rational living as:

 

If you profoundly change your philosophy – your thinking – then you’re more likely, in all probability, to profoundly change your feeling and your behavior – especially your disturbed feeling and your disturbed behavior.

 

REBT theory uses the ABC model to illustrate how when Activating events (“Actions”) occur and people maintain irrational Beliefs about the events, these unhelpful assumptions – and not the actual occurrences – are what create unpleasant cognitive, emotive, bodily sensation, and behavioral Consequences.

 

In particular, there are four predominate irrational beliefs which people use: demandingness, awfulizing, low frustration tolerance, and global evaluations. Addressing these, the ABC model incorporates Disputation of unhelpful assumptions in order to explore Effective new beliefs.

 

From a psychological standpoint, people disturb themselves using a Belief-Consequence (B-C) connection. Of course, this isn’t to suggest that in the context of the naturalistic or physical world there is no Action-Consequence (A-C) connection.

 

If lightning strikes you (Action), you may die (Consequence). Still, if you live through the experience and unproductively Believe, “That shouldn’t have happened to me,” then you’ll likely disturb yourself into sorrow, anger, or another unpleasant emotion (Consequence).

 

Thus, I help people to stop upsetting themselves through use of B-C connections, though I can’t fully resolve their A-C connections. If there were a mathematical formula for the ABC model, it would be something like: Action + Belief = Consequence ÷ Disputation = Effective new belief.

 

Furthermore, this helpful psychotherapeutic modality uses the technique of unconditional acceptance to relieve suffering. This is accomplished through use of unconditional self-acceptance, unconditional other-acceptance, and unconditional life-acceptance.

 

Additionally, a foundational component incorporated into REBT relates to Stoicism—a philosophical practice valuing four virtues (wisdom, courage, temperance or moderation, and justice) as a means of achieving eudemonia—a life well-lived. All of these techniques require frequent practice.

 

When discussing his justification for the development of REBT, Ellis stated:

 

[B]y attempting to show or teach the client some of the general rules of rational living, I tried to go beyond his immediate problem and to help provide him with a generalized mode of thinking and problem solving that would enable him to deal effectively with almost any future similar situation that might arise.

 

The rational emotive behavior therapist, then, is a frank teacher who believes wholeheartedly in a rigorous application of the rules of logic, of straight thinking, and of scientific method to everyday life, and who ruthlessly uncovers vestiges of irrational thinking in clients’ experience and energetically encourages them to adopt more rational channels.

 

In so doing, REBT does not ignore or eradicate the clients’ emotions. On the contrary, it considers them most seriously, and helps change them, when they are disordered and self-defeating, through the same means by which they commonly arise in the first place —that is, by thinking, feeling, and acting.

 

By consistently philosophically encouraging clients to change their thinking and to change their feelings, experiences and actions, the REBT therapist gives a specific impetus to the client’s movement toward mental health and growth without which it is not impossible, but unlikely, that they will move too far.

 

Thus, I help people to consider rational living and how this approach to life may better serve their interests and goals than does self-disturbingly living in accordance with irrational beliefs. If this sounds like a method in which you may be interested, I look forward to hearing from you.

 

If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life—helping you to sharpen your critical thinking skills, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.

 

As a psychotherapist, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues ranging from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.

 

At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!

 

 

Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW


 

References:

 

AEI. (n.d.). About Albert Ellis, Ph.D. Albert Ellis Institute. Retrieved from https://albertellis.org/about-albert-ellis-phd/

Cookie_Studio. (n.d.). Silly brunette woman pucker lips, looking coy and cute aside at logo, thinking, wants something, pondering with coquettish face, standing over white background [Image]. Freepik. Retrieved from https://www.freepik.com/free-photo/silly-brunette-woman-pucker-lips-looking-coy-cute-aside-logo-thinking-wants-something-pondering-with-coquettish-face-standing-white-background_23243065.htm#fromView=search&page=2&position=32&uuid=3fcdfd53-ffaf-45ea-9a21-53e1adce549a

Ellis, A. (1956, August 31). Rational psychotherapy. Albert Ellis Institute. Retrieved from https://albertellis.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Rational-Psychotherapy.pdf

Hollings, D. (2022, August 28). Change ur beliefs. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/change-ur-beliefs

Hollings, D. (2022, October 31). Demandingness. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/demandingness

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (2024, April 26). Eudaimonia. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/eudaimonia

Hollings, D. (2023, September 8). Fair use. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/fair-use

Hollings, D. (2024, April 2). Four major irrational beliefs. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/four-major-irrational-beliefs

Hollings, D. (2023, October 12). Get better. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/get-better

Hollings, D. (2023, September 13). Global evaluations. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/global-evaluations

Hollings, D. (2024, April 13). Goals. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/goals

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2024, January 2). Interests and goals. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/interests-and-goals

Hollings, D. (2023, May 18). Irrational beliefs. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/irrational-beliefs

Hollings, D. (2023, September 19). Life coaching. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/life-coaching

Hollings, D. (2023, January 8). Logic and reason. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/logic-and-reason

Hollings, D. (2022, December 2). Low frustration tolerance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/low-frustration-tolerance

Hollings, D. (2024, April 22). On disputing. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/on-disputing

Hollings, D. (2023, September 3). On feelings. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/on-feelings

Hollings, D. (2023, March 20). Practice. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/practice

Hollings, D. (2024, January 1). Psychoeducation. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/psychoeducation

Hollings, D. (2022, March 24). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy-rebt

Hollings, D. (2024, May 8). Resilience. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/resilience

Hollings, D. (2024, January 4). Rigid vs. rigorous. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rigid-vs-rigorous

Hollings, D. (2022, November 1). Self-disturbance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/self-disturbance

Hollings, D. (2024, April 21). Sensation. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/sensation

Hollings, D. (2022, October 7). Should, must, and ought. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/should-must-and-ought

Hollings, D. (2024, April 21). Stoicism. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/stoicism

Hollings, D. (2022, November 9). The ABC model. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-abc-model

Hollings, D. (2023, September 6). The absence of suffering. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-absence-of-suffering

Hollings, D. (2022, December 23). The A-C connection. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-a-c-connection

Hollings, D. (2022, December 25). The B-C connection. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-b-c-connection

Hollings, D. (2022, November 2). The formula. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-formula

Hollings, D. (2023, August 6). The science. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/the-science

Hollings, D. (2022, November 15). To don a hat. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/to-don-a-hat

Hollings, D. (2022, July 11). Unconditional acceptance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/unconditional-acceptance

Hollings, D. (2023, March 11). Unconditional life-acceptance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/unconditional-life-acceptance

Hollings, D. (2023, February 25). Unconditional other-acceptance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/unconditional-other-acceptance

Hollings, D. (2023, March 1). Unconditional self-acceptance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/unconditional-self-acceptance

Hollings, D. (2024, January 16). Understanding, belief, and practice. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/understanding-belief-and-practice

MacLaren, C., Doyle, K. A., and DiGiuseppe, R. (2016). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) theory and practice. SAGE Publications, Inc. Retrieved from https://in.sagepub.com/sites/default/files/upm-binaries/68308_Tinsley_Chapter_9.pdf

ThinkingAllowedTV. (2010, August 21). Albert Ellis: A guide to rational living - Thinking Allowed DVD w/ Jeffrey Mishlove [Video]. YouTube. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/GyRE-78g_z0?si=TeMBO0t4yJcJTcE0

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page