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  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

Frame of Reference

 

Underlying the practice of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) is a frame of reference—the mechanism for linking theory to practice. Rarely do I share the finer points of REBT theory with my clients, though I continually link the theoretical underpinnings with my practice of this psychotherapeutic intervention.

 

While REBT has its own frame of reference, each client also presents to session with his or her particular frame of reference, which one source describes as:

 

A complex set of assumptions and attitudes which we use to filter perceptions to create meaning. The frame can include beliefs, schemas, preferences, values, culture and other ways in which we bias our understanding and judgment.

 

I have my beliefs, suspicions, and principles pertaining to the world and you have yours. When working with clients, it’s important for me to properly understand their frames of reference before presenting an REBT frame, per page 38 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion.

 

For example, client X may irrationally believe that all people who vote for presidential candidate Y are moronic. This is an important piece of information for me to understand before presenting to client X the concept of global evaluation concerning others.

 

Although client X may not like candidate Y or associated voters, the REBT frame of reference that disputes client X’s rigid belief may not make as much sense to the client without first understanding the reason these frames of references clash. The mere existence of client X’s frame is in opposition to an REBT frame of reference.

 

In conclusion, it’s important to first understand a client’s frame of reference before introducing an REBT frame. Additionally, both of these frames are subject to modification, so use of flexible framing may well-serve everyone involved in the REBT process.

 

If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life—helping you to sharpen your critical thinking skills, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.

 

As a psychotherapist, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues ranging from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.

 

At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!

 

 

Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW

 

 

References:

 

Changing Minds. (n.d.). Frame of reference. Changing Works. Retrieved from http://changingminds.org/explanations/models/frame_of_reference.htm

Dryden, W. and Neenan, M. (2003). The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion. Albert Ellis Institute. ISBN 0-917476-26-3. Library of Congress Control Number: 20031044378

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Blog – Categories: Disputation. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/blog/categories/disputation

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (2023, September 8). Fair use. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/fair-use

Hollings, D. (2023, October 12). Get better. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/get-better

Hollings, D. (2023, September 13). Global evaluations. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/global-evaluations

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2023, May 18). Irrational beliefs. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/irrational-beliefs

Hollings, D. (2023, September 19). Life coaching. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/life-coaching

Hollings, D. (2022, March 25). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy-rebt

Hollings, D. (2024, January 4). Rigid vs. rigorous. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rigid-vs-rigorous

Hollings, D. 2024, January 16). Understanding, belief, and practice. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/understanding-belief-and-practice

Whedon, C. A. (2000). Frames of reference that address the impact of physical environments on occupational performance. PubMed. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12441533/

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