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  • Writer's pictureDeric Hollings

Rational Expression

 

A client recently told me that when I began working with him years ago, he didn’t fully comprehend the Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) lessons I originally introduced. He added that at some point in his treatment, the concepts I taught began to meld together.

 

Now, the client understands REBT, believes in it, and practices this psychotherapeutic modality on a regular basis. Notably, he now expresses himself in a rational fashion rather than when he first began mental, emotional, and behavioral health care services with me.

 

For instance, when the client began treatment, he would express himself by saying something like, “I feel like other people just don’t understand me.” Using psychoeducation and repeated reminders, the client eventually altered the way he spoke.

 

Feelings represent emotions and bodily sensations, not thoughts, beliefs, or suspicions. Now, it isn’t uncommon for this individual to appropriately express something along the lines of, “I believe other people may fail to understand my perspective.”

 

Aside from taking personal responsibility and accountability expressed through proper phrasing, this client understands how demandingness, awfulizing, low frustration tolerance, and global evaluations are forms of irrational belief-based expression which don’t serve him well.

 

Regarding how I approached this client’s care, page 59 of The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion invites REBT practitioners to encourage clients to express themselves in a structured REBT-focused manner. By doing so, clients discover how to talk the talk as they learn how to walk the walk, so to speak.

 

When seeking treatment or management services with me, rational expression begins at the first session. Although clients may not fully comprehend the lessons I initially introduce, they tend to understand the tenets of REBT along the way. Would you like to know more about how this is accomplished?

 

If you’re looking for a provider who works to help you understand how thinking impacts physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral elements of your life—helping you to sharpen your critical thinking skills, I invite you to reach out today by using the contact widget on my website.

 

As a psychotherapist, I’m pleased to help people with an assortment of issues ranging from anger (hostility, rage, and aggression) to relational issues, adjustment matters, trauma experience, justice involvement, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, and other mood or personality-related matters.

 

At Hollings Therapy, LLC, serving all of Texas, I aim to treat clients with dignity and respect while offering a multi-lensed approach to the practice of psychotherapy and life coaching. My mission includes: Prioritizing the cognitive and emotive needs of clients, an overall reduction in client suffering, and supporting sustainable growth for the clients I serve. Rather than simply helping you to feel better, I want to help you get better!

 

 

Deric Hollings, LPC, LCSW


 

References:

 

Dryden, W. and Neenan, M. (2003). The REBT Therapist’s Pocket Companion. Albert Ellis Institute. ISBN 0-917476-26-3. Library of Congress Control Number: 20031044378

Hollings, D. (2022, October 31). Demandingness. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/demandingness

Hollings, D. (2022, March 15). Disclaimer. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/disclaimer

Hollings, D. (2023, September 8). Fair use. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/fair-use

Hollings, D. (2023, October 12). Get better. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/get-better

Hollings, D. (2023, September 13). Global evaluations. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/global-evaluations

Hollings, D. (n.d.). Hollings Therapy, LLC [Official website]. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/

Hollings, D. (2023, May 18). Irrational beliefs. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/irrational-beliefs

Hollings, D. (2023, September 19). Life coaching. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/life-coaching

Hollings, D. (2022, December 2). Low frustration tolerance. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/low-frustration-tolerance

Hollings, D. (2022, November 7). Personal ownership. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/personal-ownership

Hollings, D. (2024, January 1). Psychoeducation. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/psychoeducation

Hollings, D. (2022, March 25). Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT). Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/rational-emotive-behavior-therapy-rebt

Hollings, D. (2022, November 15). To don a hat. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/to-don-a-hat

Hollings, D. 2024, January 16). Understanding, belief, and practice. Hollings Therapy, LLC. Retrieved from https://www.hollingstherapy.com/post/understanding-belief-and-practice

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